DC Jazz Calendar

IMPORTANT NOTE:

Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, all previously scheduled gigs are canceled or postponed until further notice. We are now listing virtual and streamed gigs on this calendar; please get in contact with listings editor Jackson Sinnenberg to submit for a listing.

Guide to the calendar:
* = CB Pick
** = CapitalBop Show
v v categories are neighborhoods
v v tags sort by free events, venues with food, CapitalBop shows, and more
Mar
27
Fri
* Mark G. Meadows Birthday Livestream @ Facebook and Instagram Live
Mar 27 @ 8:00 pm

Pianist and vocalist Mark Meadows is one cornerstone keyboardists on the D.C. jazz scene.  With his band, the Movement, Meadows makes music that fits comfortably between the genre-bending futurist fusion of Robert Glasper and the righteous, right-on soul of Marvin Gaye and Curtis Mayfield.

He hosts a livestream to celebrate his birthday!

CANCELED * Heidi Martin: Abbey! (Livestream)
Mar 27 @ 8:00 pm

UPDATE: In accordance with Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s recent executive order, all non-essential services have been ordered to suspend operations. As a result, Blue House Productions with suspend operations and streams until further notice.

Vocalist Heidi Martin is one of D.C.’s treasures: She emits messages complex but clear, with an essence of mourning and resilience that hints at Billie Holiday and a quavering force not unlike Joni Mitchell’s. But as a poet, she’s most closely linked to Abbey Lincoln, that vocalist and composer whose ear was always turned toward the acridity of injustice—not just its effects, but the ways we push it aside by drilling down.

She performs with a quintet featuring D.C. all stars like bassist Michael Bowie and pianist Colin Chambers to celebrate Abbey Lincoln and stream some of her works in this time of crisis.

The livestream will go live on the The Covid Sessions at Blue House Productions Facebook page at 8 p.m.

 

Apr
24
Fri
* Aaron L. Myers II @ Mr. Henry's
Apr 24 @ 8:00 pm

Vocalist and pianist Aaron Myers tugs jazz standards down into cozy, soul-warming territory. He also writes his own tunes, often with a heavy blues influence.

* Donvonte McCoy Quintet @ 18th St. Lounge
Apr 24 @ 10:00 pm

Arguably the city’s best jazz trumpeter, Donvonte McCoy plays every Friday and Saturday at the hip 18th St. Lounge. He likes to mix in some funk as well during the lounge gig, and he’s liable to inflect a touch of Chuck Brown-esque groove into his combo’s treatment of classic bop tunes by the likes of Miles Davis and Freddie Hubbard. After all, the setting is that of a dance club, not a jazz joint – no tables and chairs or hushed applause after every solo.

Apr
25
Sat
* Steve Arnold Quartet @ SPIN
Apr 25 @ 6:00 pm

Steve Arnold is at the very start of his career, but he’s already a go-to sideman for many prominent leaders in the District. His original compositions suggest stories set in the open fields of his native Western Massachusetts, told through the complex language of modern jazz.

* Donvonte McCoy Quintet @ 18th St. Lounge
Apr 25 @ 10:00 pm

Arguably the city’s best jazz trumpeter, Donvonte McCoy plays every Friday and Saturday at the hip 18th St. Lounge. He likes to mix in some funk as well during the lounge gig, and he’s liable to inflect a touch of Chuck Brown-esque groove into his combo’s treatment of classic bop tunes by the likes of Miles Davis and Freddie Hubbard. After all, the setting is that of a dance club, not a jazz joint – no tables and chairs or hushed applause after every solo.

Apr
27
Mon
* Elijah Easton Trio @ Harlot D.C.
Apr 27 @ 8:00 pm

Elijah Easton is one of the DMV’s most awe-inspiring young talents, but a Google search on him won’t turn up much. Like many of D.C.’s great artists, Easton has built his career confidently but quietly, embedded deep within the city’s music community, doing the work, waiting patiently for the rewards to come as they will. You can find Easton at the center of many of D.C.’s most exciting musical projects: the future-funk of Nag Champa; the go-go fusion of Marc Cary’s Indigenous People; the hard-hitting postbop of Joe Brotherton’s Wednesday-night hang at JoJo.

He used to host an incredible residency on Tuesdays at Service Bar with Tarus Mateen on bass and Dana J. Hawkins on drums. Their, he established a sound for his group, developing some signature, hard-hitting versions of jazz standards that incorporated funk, go-go, jazz fusion, drum-and-bass and more.

That group now plays at Harlot D.C., in the former Tap & Parlor space, every Monday.

* Mashup Mondays and Jam Session @ Homestead Food
Apr 27 @ 8:00 pm

Every week at Petworth’s Homestead, the genre-blurring guitarist Dave Manley seeks to mix together people from various pockets of the D.C. music scene. Both those sitting in and the house band (which changes weekly) regularly include the D.C. scene’s most in-demand players.

Apr
28
Tue
* Tedd Baker and Friends @ Jojo Restaurant and Bar
Apr 28 @ 7:30 pm

Tedd Baker is not only a staple on the D.C. jazz scene, but also one of the horn players in the military band Airmen of Note. His tone on the tenor saxophone is well-polished, light and breezy but with a good amount of brash metallicism.

On Tuesdays, he can be found holding forth at Jojo Restaurant and Bar with a rotating cast of musicians; often he’s joined in a trio by bassist Kris Funn and drummer Quincy Phillips, one of the tightest rhythm sections in the region.

* Shannon Gunn & the Firebird Organ Trio @ Club Heaven & Hell
Apr 28 @ 8:00 pm

Trombonist Shannon Gunn is an imaginative musician and frequent bandleader at venues across D.C. She could be found on Tuesdays at Columbia Station and now at Club Heaven & Hell, reworking bop classics in an organ-trio format and at other times leading her own big band through simmering soul jazz; she’s even been known to arrange Rage Against the Machine for improvising ensembles.

At these Tuesday sessions, Gunn uses the first set of the night for tinkering on her latest arrangements, sometimes re-imagining monumental albums in the jazz world by figures like Horace Silver, Art Blakey and Cedar Walton. The second set opens up for a jam, with local musicians often bringing their instruments and original compositions to the mix.

 


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