Weekend in Jazz | 10.14-10.16: Marsalis, Haynes, Spalding and Bennett play major concerts

Esperanza Spalding plays on Sunday at the Warner Theatre. Courtesy Pennello/flickr

by Giovanni Russonello
Editor-in-chief

If you’re a jazz club rat, this might be the perfect weekend to break out of your bad habits. By bad, of course, we mean good. (This is jazz-speak, after all — dig?) But there comes a time when it’s necessary to branch out, and if you’re itching for something a bit more rarefied than the typical jazz bar, this is the weekend for you: There’s a handful of spectacular concerts at theaters and performing arts centers around the D.C. area. The theaters at George Washington and George Mason Universities both host exciting shows on Saturday, though our money is on the latter, where the Branford Marsalis Quartet is set to hit the stage. The Warner Theatre is presenting two separate nights of music from just about the most disparate jazz vocalists you could imagine: octogenarian Tony Bennett (Friday) and jazz’s newest “new hope,” Esperanza Spalding (Sunday). If that’s not enough for you, the Kennedy Center’s KC Jazz Club (or just the Terrace Gallery on its less swingin’ evenings) presents drum giant Roy Haynes with his Fountain of Youth Band on Friday and Saturday.

Of course, there are great shows at the usual U Street spots, too – especially Anthony Nelson at Twins Jazz and Benito Gonzalez at Bohemian Caverns. You can find details on these performances and many others in this week’s edition of “Weekend in Jazz,” a listing of every D.C. jazz show on our radar. Our favorites have a label, and as always, you can read CapitalBop’s full listings directly at our D.C. jazz calendar, if you’d rather. Happy hunting!

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14

cb picks:

  • Roy Haynes, KC Jazz Club, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
  • Tony Bennett, Warner Theatre, 8 p.m.
  • Benito Gonzalez, Bohemian Caverns, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m.
  • Anthony Nelson, Twins Jazz, 9 & 11 p.m.
  • Donvonte McCoy, 18th Street Lounge, 10:30 p.m.

Larry Brown Quintet, Westminster Presbyterian Church, 6 p.m. | This week’s edition of Westminster Presbyterian’s “Jazz Night” features the straight-ahead piano master Larry Brown and his regular quintet, featuring Thad Wilson on trumpet, Peter Fraize on sax, Kent Miller on bass and Greg Holloway on drums. $5 cover for adults, no cover for attendees under 16, no minimum View event on calendar | Westminster Presbyterian Church website

Karen Gray Trio, Sala Thai (Bethesda), 7 p.m.| Commanding vocalist Karen Gray sings laid-back renditions of jazz standards in a drumless trio. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Sala Thai website

Yamomanem Jazz Band, Sala Thai (U St.), 7 p.m. | The Yamomanem Jazz Band plays a faithful take on New Orleans jazz, conjuring the days of King Oliver and early Louis Armstrong with its lush brass section. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Sala Thai website

Jacqui Simmons & Friends, Sala Thai (Petworth), 7 p.m. | Jacqui Simmons sings jazz standards with a heartfelt and elegant presentation. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Sala Thai website

Jolley Brothers, B. Smith’s, 7 p.m. | The Jolley Brothers, Noble on keyboard and Nate on drums, play thrice a weekend at B. Smith’s, the upscale soul-food restaurant in Union Station’s massive East Hall. The Jolleys, who perform with a bassist, comprise one of D.C.’s most exciting and auspicious acts. With roots in gospel, soul and the modal bop of the 1960s, the brothers (who also compose prolifically) bring some of the most creative elements in the African-American music canon forward into the 21st century, all while stamping it with their own distinctive flavoring. But B. Smith’s is a restaurant first, and the music remains in the background – no matter how expertly played. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | B. Smith’s website

Roy Haynes & the Fountain of Youth Band, KC Jazz Club, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. | Maybe you should go hear Roy Haynes because he’s one of the best drummers of all time, a distinctive stylist who helped fashion the basic language of bebop and is immediately recognizable for his beat-pushing patter. Or maybe you should go for the benefit of your aging grandparents; after all, Haynes doesn’t call his group the Fountain of Youth Band for nothing – strong scientific evidence suggests this man has truly found Juan Ponce de León’s holy grail. Haynes, 86, doesn’t just play with the intensity and spry abandon of a man one-quarter his age, he comports himself in much the same way. The ever-energetic Haynes owns a number of sports cars, and two houses – one on Long Island and another in Las Vegas, where he likes to go every few months to party and hang out with friends. The current incarnation of the Fountain of Youth Band includes the searing saxophonist Jaleel Shaw, pianist Martin Bejerano and bassist David Wong. All are in their twenties. Two separate shows at 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. $35 cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | KC Jazz Club profile

Jonathan Butler, Blues Alley, 8 & 10 p.m. | Jonathan Butler, the first Black musician to have his music played on white-controlled South African radio, sings R&B and smooth jazz, often with gospel influences. Over the past four decades, he has had hits across the globe, including his 1987 U.S. breakthrough “Lies.” Two separate shows at 8 & 10 p.m. $50 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar | Blues Alley profile

Tony Bennett, Warner Theatre, 8 p.m. | Vocal legend Tony Bennett sure knows how to get inside of a lyric. Like all the best singers, he believes in the magic of a song’s message: It’s not just about the music, the diction, the pitch – it’s about the heart of the tune. He found fame in the 1950s as a pop singer, but went on to record with Count Basie, Bill Evans and other jazz greats, and by now has been accepted into the jazz pantheon. Ticket prices vary ($85-$150), no minimum. View event on calendar | Warner Theatre website

Sharón Clark Quartet, Mandarin Oriental Hotel, 8 p.m. | Vocalist Sharón Clark sings with fervor and soul, plus impressive precision. She’s one of D.C.’s top jazz singers. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Mandarin Oriental Hotel website

Benito Gonzalez, Bohemian Caverns, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m. | Pianist Benito Gonzalez, now a major force on the New York jazz scene, has moved around a lot but will always retain a special place in the heart of D.C. jazz lovers. Before moving to New York, the Venezuelan-born Gonzalez spent years as the top pianist on the scene here. His language is founded in bebop, with quick and fiery runs up top and a pounding, trenchant left hand (stacked fourths à la McCoy Tyner are a distinctive foundation). But Gonzalez pours in plenty of Latin jazz, with montunos and straight-feel soloing layered over his swing. One of the best things about seeing Gonzalez play is the visceral joy he gets from it, and how he pours everything he has into each performance. On his recent CD, “Circles,” a star-studded cast joined Gonzalez: saxophonists Ron Blake, Myron Walden and Azar Lawrence, bassist Christian McBride and drummer Jeff “Tain” Watts. At Bohemian he’ll be performing with a quartet. Two separate sets at 8:30 & 10:30 p.m. $18 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar | Bohemian Caverns profile

Sin Miedo, Bossa Bistro, 9 p.m. | Sin Miedo is an energetic, nine-piece Salsa band that plays highly danceable Afro-Cuban jazz, Mambo and Samba. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Bossa Bistro website

Antonio Parker, HR-57, 9 p.m. | Alto saxophonist Antonio Parker’s playing is swingin’ and soulful, with a bright, aggressive tone and inclinations that bring neo-soul and R&B influences into his otherwise straight-ahead bebop. Parker often pays tribute to John Coltrane with song dedications and covers, but his style on the horn often nods toward one of his personal favorites, the contemporary master Kenny Garrett. $15 cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | HR-57 website

Peter Edelman Trio, Columbia Station, 9 p.m. | The stalwart D.C. piano player Peter Edelman every week leads a rotating cast of musicians that often outgrows the title “trio.” No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Columbia Station profile

Anthony Nelson, Twins Jazz, 9 & 11 p.m. | Multi-talented woodwind player Anthony Nelson, who typically sticks to saxophone, has a slick, soulful approach to improvisation. He sometimes performs with a strolling trio (only bass and drums), and his brawny tenor tone is well disposed to fill in any extra space. But here he will perform with a full quartet – and one that features some of D.C.’s greatest talents, to boot: Allyn Johnson on piano, the living legend Steve Novosel on bass and Howard Franklin on drums. Two separate sets at 9 and 11 p.m. $15 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar | Twins Jazz profile

Maureen Mullaney, Black Fox Lounge, 9:30 p.m. | Maureen Mullaney sings jazz and blues songs with a light ensemble. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarBlack Fox profile

Donvonte McCoy, 18th St. Lounge, 10:30 p.m. | Arguably the city’s best jazz trumpeter, Donvonte McCoy plays every Friday and Saturday at the hip 18th St. Lounge. He likes to mix in some funk as well during the lounge gig, and he’s liable to inflect a touch of Chuck Brown-esque groove into his combo’s treatment of classic bop tunes by the likes of Miles Davis and Freddie Hubbard. After all, the setting is that of a dance club, not a jazz joint – no tables and chairs or hushed applause after every solo. Cover varies ($5-10), no minimum. View event on calendar | 18th St. Lounge profile

DeAndrey Howard’s Collector’s Edition, Utopia, 11 p.m. | Trumpeter DeAndre Howard’s regular engagements at Utopia bring hordes to the restaurant and bar. He and his small group, Collector’s Edition, play standards with a friendly, inviting touch, and they add to the positive vibes already flowing throughout the room — especially when Howard tosses aside the trumpet to sing a spontaneous blues. no cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Utopia profile

SATURDAY, October 15

cb picks:

  • Roy Haynes, KC Jazz Club, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
  • Branford Marsalis Quartet, GMU Center for the Arts, 8 p.m.
  • Benito Gonzalez, Bohemian Caverns, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m.
  • Jimmy “Junebug” Jackson Quartet, HR-57, 9 p.m.
  • Anthony Nelson, Twins Jazz, 9 & 11 p.m.
  • Donvonte McCoy, 18th Street Lounge, 10:30 p.m.

Jam Session with Peter Edelman, Columbia Station, 4 p.m.| Pianist Peter Edelman, a constant presence on the D.C. jazz scene for years now, leads an afternoon jam session every Saturday and Sunday. No cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | Columbia Station profile

Charles Woods, Johnny’s Half Shell, 6 p.m. | Saxophonist Charles Woods plays and has recorded in both free and straight-ahead jazz styles, but for his regular gig at Johnny’s Half Shell he keeps things within the traditional bop realm. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarJohnny’s Half Shell website

Jolley Brothers, B. Smith’s, 7 p.m. | The Jolley Brothers, Noble on keyboard and Nate on drums, play thrice a weekend at B. Smith’s, the upscale soul-food restaurant in Union Station’s massive East Hall. The Jolleys, who perform with a bassist, comprise one of D.C.’s most exciting and auspicious acts. With roots in gospel, soul and the modal bop of the 1960s, the brothers (who also compose prolifically) bring some of the most creative elements in the African-American music canon forward into the 21st century, all while stamping it with their own distinctive flavoring. But B. Smith’s is a restaurant first, and the music remains in the background – no matter how expertly played. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarB. Smith’s website

Mark Mosley Trio, Sala Thai (U St.), 7 p.m. | Baltimore guitarist Mark Mosley plays a slick hand as a smooth jazz guitarist, but he can also hunker down on serious bop. He performs laid-back straight-ahead here with his trio. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Sala Thai website

Full Ascent, Sala Thai (Petworth), 7 p.m. | This jazz band plays in a number of traditional styles, from hard-bop to Dixieland to calypso. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarSala Thai website

Roy Haynes & the Fountain of Youth Band, KC Jazz Club, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. | Maybe you should go hear Roy Haynes because he’s one of the best drummers of all time, a distinctive stylist who helped fashion the basic language of bebop and is immediately recognizable for his beat-pushing patter. Or maybe you should go for the benefit of your aging grandparents; after all, Haynes doesn’t call his group the Fountain of Youth Band for nothing – strong scientific evidence suggests this man has truly found Juan Ponce de León’s holy grail. Haynes, 86, doesn’t just play with the intensity and spry abandon of a man one-quarter his age, he comports himself in much the same way. The ever-energetic Haynes owns a number of sports cars, and two houses – one on Long Island and another in Las Vegas, where he likes to go every few months to party and hang out with friends. The current incarnation of the Fountain of Youth Band includes the searing saxophonist Jaleel Shaw, pianist Martin Bejerano and bassist David Wong. All are in their twenties. Two separate shows at 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. $35 cover, no minimum. View event on calendarKC Jazz Club profile

Nancy Scimone, Henley Park Hotel, 7:30 p.m. | Nancy Scimone reaches into the jazz and popular American songbooks during this weekly gig at the Henley Park Hotel in downtown D.C. She’s typically joined by a pianist. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Henley Park’s website

Lena Seikaly & Potomac Jazz Project, Extra Virgin Restaurant, 7:30 p.m. | Vocalist Lena Seikaly sings jazz standards with a confident and playful demeanor, displaying a haziness reminiscent of Esperanza Spalding as well as a deference to traditional greats. The Potomac Jazz Project is a quartet that takes on modern and classic jazz tunes (and even some pop covers) with a showmanly flair, as well as skill. It’s led by bassist Stan Hamrick, and its rotating lineup often features some of D.C.’s best musicians. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarExtra Virgin’s website

Janine Gilbert-Carter Quartet, Mandarin Oriental Hotel, 8 p.m. | Vocalist Janine Gilbert-Carter has a fulsome set of pipes that employs with masterful finesse and delicateness, in a style not entirely unlike Betty Carter’s. She often sings gospel, but she’s just as apt to do straight-ahead jazz – which is what’s on the bill at the Mandarin Oriental. No cover, 1-drink minimum View event on calendar | Mandarin Oriental Hotel website

Jonathan Butler, Blues Alley, 8 & 10 p.m. | Jonathan Butler, the first Black musician to have his music played on white-controlled South African radio, sings R&B and smooth jazz, often with gospel influences. Over the past four decades, he has had hits across the globe, including his 1987 U.S. breakthrough “Lies.” Two separate shows at 8 & 10 p.m. $50 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar| Blues Alley profile

Click for more info on Marsalis's show.

Branford Marsalis Quartet, GMU Center for the Arts, 8 p.m. | Branford Marsalis, the eldest of four famous musician brothers, is one of the most important saxophonists of this era. The influences of great improvisers from the 1950s and ’60s – Sonny Rollins and Joe Henderson, especially – run strong, but his interests are diffuse and his impulses forward-looking. Over the course of the 1980s, Marsalis recorded and performed with Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers, toured with Sting, and took a saxophone solo on Public Enemy’s famous “Fight the Power” (commonly believed to be one of the most influential hip-hop songs in history). Nowadays, the saxophonist typically sticks to straight-ahead jazz, but – never one to hem himself in – he just released a record with pianist Joey Calderazzo exploring their mutual love of the German classical music known as lieder. At this George Mason University performance, Marsalis appears with his jazz quartet for some top-shelf, hard-swinging post-bop. The band includes Calderazzo, bassist Christian Dashiell and drummer Justin Faulkner (a young sensation who is not to be missed). Ticket prices vary ($24 to $48). View event on calendar | GMU Center for the Arts website

Carmen Bradford & the Airmen of Note, GWU Lisner Auditorium, 8 p.m. | Appearing as part of George Washington University’s Jazz Heritage Series, seasoned vocalist Carmen Bradford performs at the Lisner Auditorium with the Air Force’s world-class swing band, the Airmen of Note. Bradford is a punchy singer, with plenty of soul and fire to boot. Free. View event on calendar | Lisner website

Benito Gonzalez, Bohemian Caverns, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m. | Pianist Benito Gonzalez, now a major force on the New York jazz scene, has moved around a lot but will always retain a special place in the heart of D.C. jazz lovers. Before moving to New York, the Venezuelan-born Gonzalez spent years as the top pianist on the scene here. His language is founded in bebop, with quick and fiery runs up top and a pounding, trenchant left hand (stacked fourths à la McCoy Tyner are a distinctive foundation). But Gonzalez pours in plenty of Latin jazz, with montunos and straight-feel soloing layered over his swing. One of the best things about seeing Gonzalez play is the visceral joy he gets from it, and how he pours everything he has into each performance. On his recent CD, “Circles,” a star-studded cast joined Gonzalez: saxophonists Ron Blake, Myron Walden and Azar Lawrence, bassist Christian McBride and drummer Jeff “Tain” Watts. At Bohemian he’ll be performing with a quartet. Two separate sets at 8:30 & 10:30 p.m. $18 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar | Bohemian Caverns profile

Palanke Music Company, Bossa Bistro, 9 p.m. | Led by vocalist and guitarist Jaime Andrés Salazar, a.k.a. Gato, Palanke Music Company is tropicalia meets electro meets Samba meets Afro-Cuban jazz. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Bossa profile

Jimmy “Junebug” Jackson Quartet, HR-57, 9 p.m. | Drummer Jimmy “Junebug” Jackson is one of D.C.’s swingin’est drummers, and when he decides to bring the heat, watch out. He has a strong, distinctive shuffle beat, which he perfected during his two decades on the road with soul-jazz master Jimmy Smith. When the spirit moves him, Junebug sometimes steps up to the mic and graces the audience with a song. $15 cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | HR-57 website

Anthony Nelson, Twins Jazz, 9 & 11 p.m. | Multi-talented woodwind player Anthony Nelson, who typically sticks to saxophone, has a slick, soulful approach to improvisation. He sometimes performs with a strolling trio (only bass and drums), and his brawny tenor tone is well disposed to fill in any extra space. But here he will perform with a full quartet – and one that features some of D.C.’s greatest talents, to boot: Allyn Johnson on piano, the living legend Steve Novosel on bass and Howard Franklin on drums. Two separate sets at 9 and 11 p.m. $15 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar |Twins Jazz profile

Donvonte McCoy, 18th St. Lounge, 10:30 p.m. | Arguably the city’s best jazz trumpeter, Donvonte McCoy plays every Friday and Saturday at the hip 18th St. Lounge. He likes to mix in some funk as well during the lounge gig, and he’s liable to inflect a touch of Chuck Brown-esque groove into his combo’s treatment of classic bop tunes by the likes of Miles Davis and Freddie Hubbard. After all, the setting is that of a dance club, not a jazz joint – no tables and chairs or hushed applause after every solo. Cover varies ($5-10), no minimum. View event on calendar | 18th St. Lounge profile

DeAndrey Howard’s Collector’s Edition, Utopia, 11 p.m. | Trumpeter DeAndre Howard’s regular engagements at Utopia bring hordes to the restaurant and bar. He and his small group, Collector’s Edition, play standards with a friendly, inviting touch, and they add to the positive vibes already flowing throughout the room — especially when Howard tosses aside the trumpet to sing a spontaneous blues. no cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar |Utopia profile

The Hang, Bohemian Caverns, midnight | Bohemian Caverns’ late-night jam, The Hang, is hosted by a different band every week of the month. The kitchen remains open until 1 a.m., so there’s a chance to get a late bite without having to traipse to Ben’s Chili Bowl. $7 cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | Bohemian Caverns profile

SUNDAY, October 16

cb picks:

  • Marshall Keys, Acadiana, 11 a.m.
  • Esperanza Spalding, Warner Theatre, 8 p.m.

Marshall Keys, Acadiana, 11 a.m.| Marshall Keys’ saxophone can sing the blues or swing to the rhythms of bebop with a laid-back sense of cool; the native Washingtonian is a fluid, graceful player. He plays every Sunday brunch at Acadiana, usually with a group consisting of the city’s top jazz scene veterans: Federico Peña on piano, Tarus Mateen on bass and either Lenny Robinson or Mark Prince on drums. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Acadiana website

Jolley Brothers, B. Smith’s, 12 p.m. | The Jolley Brothers, Noble on keyboard and Nate on drums, play thrice a weekend at B. Smith’s, the upscale soul-food restaurant in Union Station’s massive East Hall. The Jolleys, who perform with a bassist, comprise one of D.C.’s most exciting and auspicious acts. With roots in gospel, soul and the modal bop of the 1960s, the brothers (who also compose prolifically) bring some of the most creative elements in the African-American music canon forward into the 21st century, all while stamping it with their own distinctive flavoring. B. Smith’s is a restaurant first, and the music remains in the background – no matter how expertly played. But as far as jazz brunch goes, it’s hard to top the Jolleys’ music. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | B. Smith’s website

Jam Session with Peter Edelman, Columbia Station, 4 p.m. | Pianist Peter Edelman, a constant presence on the D.C. jazz scene for years now, leads an afternoon jam session every Saturday and Sunday. No cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | Columbia Station profile

Potomac Jazz Project, Laporta’s, 6:30 p.m. | The Potomac Jazz Project is a quartet that takes on modern and classic jazz tunes (and even some pop covers) with a showmanly flair, as well as skill. It’s led by bassist Stan Hamrick, and its rotating lineup often features some of D.C.’s best musicians. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Laporta’s website

Jazz Jam, Dahlak, 6:30 p.m.| This jazz jam presents a friendly, relaxed environment where professionals and amateurs can play together. No cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | View Dahlak profile

DC Choro, Grill from Ipanema, 7:30 p.m.| DC Choro is a sextet that plays Brazilian music drawing on European folk traditions. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarGrill from Ipanema profile

Mike Flaherty’s Dixieland Jazz Direct, Zoo Bar Café, 7:30 p.m.| This combo specializes in traditional New Orleans-style jazz. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarZoo Bar website

Esperanza Spalding, Warner Theatre, 8 p.m. | Esperanza Spalding is one of jazz’s most talked-about sensations. The 24-year-old bassist, vocalist and recent winner of the Best New Artist Grammy has never tethered herself to any particular musical entry point. She has played in punk bands and classic jazz trios, but her bass playing always retains a recognizable, full-bodied sound and delicate touch, and her vocals emerge smoky and smart. Spalding’s latest album, the phenomenally received “Chamber Music Society,” busies itself searching for that elusive nexus between classical, jazz and popular song. She will play music from the album at this Warner Theater show. Tickets $49.50, no minimum. View event on calendarWarner Theatre website

Conscious Brother, Twins Jazz, 8 & 10 p.m. | Guitarist Tom Newman’s band, Conscious Brother, plays a blend of instrumental funk, jazz, rock and electric blues. The band consists of Newman, keyboardist Conrad Conners, bassist Avon Lucas and drummer Larry Bright. Two separate sets at 8 and 10 p.m. $15 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendarTwins Jazz profile

Jonathan Butler, Blues Alley, 8 & 10 p.m. | Jonathan Butler, the first Black musician to have his music played on white-controlled South African radio, sings R&B and smooth jazz, often with gospel influences. Over the past four decades, he has had hits across the globe, including his 1987 U.S. breakthrough “Lies.” Two separate shows at 8 & 10 p.m. $50 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar | Blues Alley profile

Peter Edelman Trio, Columbia Station, 8:30 p.m.| The stalwart D.C. piano player Peter Edelman every Sunday night leads a rotating cast of musicians that often outgrows the title “trio.” no cover, one-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Columbia Station profile

Cheryl Jones Trio, Utopia, 9 p.m. | Singer Cheryl Jones has a weekly engagement every Sunday at Utopia, where she sings with depth, force and clarity. Jones is equally likely to sing jazz standards, pop tunes or gospel classics. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Utopia profile







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