Weekend in Jazz | 4.15-4.17: Ben Williams comes home; Brubeck, Parlato & ELEW are in town

D.C. native Ben Williams plays at the KC Jazz Club this weekend. Carlyle V. Smith/CapitalBop

by Giovanni Russonello
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Welcome to this week’s edition of “Weekend in Jazz,” our list of every D.C. jazz show on our radar. A head-turning cast of headliners has made its way to the District for shows this weekend. The most exciting from a local standpoint is Ben Williams, the Duke Ellington School of the Arts graduate who won the Monk Competition and has been hitting it big in New York City. Other than that, Dave Brubeck is here for a three-night stint, and Gretchen Parlato and Eric Lewis both perform Friday and Saturday. Those and all of our favorite shows have a  label. As always, you can read CapitalBop’s full listings directly at our D.C. jazz calendar, if you’d rather. Happy hunting!

FRIDAY, APR. 15

cb picks:

  • Antonio Parker Quartet, Westminster Presbyterian, 6 p.m.
  • Ben Williams, KC Jazz Club, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
  • Dave Brubeck, Blues Alley, 8 p.m.
  • Gretchen Parlato, Bohemian Caverns, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m.
  • Eric Lewis a.k.a. ELEW, HR-57, 9 p.m.
  • Donvonte McCoy, 18th Street Lounge, 10:30 p.m.

Betty Carter’s Jazz Ahead, Kennedy Center Millenium Stage, 6 p.m. | The revolutionary vocalist Betty Carter founded the Jazz Ahead program at the Kennedy Center to promote and foster young innovators in the music. She has since passed away, but the program remains. Here, the current members of the competitive program – which has produced a range of famous musicians – perform in ensembles. Free. View event on calendar | Millenium Stage website

Antonio Parker Quintet, Westminster Presbyterian Church, 6:30 p.m. | D.C’s soul-jazz saxophone champion Antonio Parker leads the Jazz Night festivities this week at Westminster Presbyterian Church. The altoist is a regular bandleader at HR-57 (he played the club’s reopening last weekend, in fact), often leading his band through wide-swingin’ renditions of standards and groove-heavy originals. Much of the same fare will probably be on tap here, as he plays with a crew of frequent faces at HR: Thad Wilson on trumpet, Chaney Thomas on bass, Hope Udobi on piano and Keith Killgo on drums. $5 cover for adults, no cover for attendees under 16, no minimum. View event on calendar | Westminster Presbyterian Church website

John Santos Workshop, National Museum of American History, 6:30 p.m. | The four-time Grammy nominated Afro-Cuban percussionist John Santos leads his sextet in this Latin jazz performance and discussion. The program is titled “Filosofía Caribeña,” and its aim is to explore the confluence of Latinos and Blacks in the history of the Americas. Free. View event on calendar | Museum website

L’Tanya Mari Trio, Sala Thai (Petworth), 7 p.m. | Singer L’Tanya Mari is influenced by Ella Fitzgerald, singing jazz with depth and soulful warmth. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Sala Thai website

Karen Gray Trio, Sala Thai (Bethesda), 7 p.m. | Commanding vocalist Karen Gray is joined by pianist Bob Sykes and bassist Hugh Johnson in her laid-back renditions of jazz standards. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Sala Thai website

Potomac Jazz Project, Sala Thai (U St.), 7 p.m. | The Potomac Jazz Project is a jazz combo, led by bassist Stan Hamrick, that takes on modern and classic jazz tunes with a showmanly flair, as well as skill. The cast of supporting musicians tends to rotate, but it’s usually a very solid lineup. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Sala Thai website

Jolley Brothers, B. Smith’s, 7 p.m. | The Jolley Brothers, Noble on keyboard and Nate on drums, play thrice a weekend at B. Smith’s, the upscale soul-food restaurant in Union Station’s massive East Hall. The Jolleys, who perform with a bassist, comprise one of D.C.’s most exciting and auspicious acts. With roots in gospel, soul and the modal bop of the 1960s, the brothers (who also compose prolifically) bring some of the most creative elements in the African-American music canon forward into the 21st century, all while stamping it with their own distinctive flavoring. But B. Smith’s is a restaurant first, and the music remains in the background – no matter how expertly played. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | B. Smith’s website

Elijah & the Po’ Boys, Bayou, 7 p.m. | Tenor saxophonist Elijah Jamal Balbed leads the Po’ Boys trio — usually with drums and guitar — four nights a week during dinnertime hours at the New Orleans-themed Bayou. A strong, Dexter Gordon-like player, he performs mostly tunes from hard bop’s heyday and other standards. To hear Balbed stretch out with a full quintet, stay late on a Thursday night, when he plays Bayou’s featured set. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Bayou profile

Ben Williams, KC Jazz Club, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. | Ben Williams may be the D.C. jazz community’s most celebrated son, having won the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition and moved on to a flourishing career in New York City. The Duke Ellington School of the Arts graduate is only in his mid-20s, but he’s already making a name for himself as a sideman with such artists as Marcus Strickland, Stefon Harris and Helen Sung. For this pair of sets at the KC Jazz Club, he takes the leader’s chair and plays some of his own original tunes. Williams swings deeply, but has a contemporary impulse. He commands the bass gently, and elicits a sonorous clarity. The New York Times’ Nate Chinen wrote in 2009 that his debut as a leader in New York City featured “a pair of harmonically sound original compositions and a balance of tradition and novelty.” Something similar is probably on tap at the Kennedy Center. Two separate shows at 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. $16 cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | KC Jazz Club profile

Dave Brubeck, Blues Alley, 8 p.m. | Legendary pianist, composer and odd meter master Dave Brubeck is celebrating his 90th year. His birthday was in December, but he’s been playing celebratory concerts for the past five months. Now it’s Washington’s turn for a birthday party. Brubeck’s “Take Five” and “Blue Rondo à la Turk” – from his landmark 1959 LP, Take Five – are classics for their bold but palatable explorations of odd time signatures. They’re credited with revolutionizing the way some jazz musicians think utilize rhythm and meter. Brubeck has by now assembled a vast catalog that includes scores of albums and even some long, orchestral suites, but with his touring band he still plays classic quartet tunes and standards. Only one set. $150 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar| Blues Alley profile

Denise King Quartet, Mandarin Oriental Hotel, 8 p.m. | Vocalist Denise King, based in Philadelphia, sings a strong, lively and highly interactive blend of blues and jazz. She’s joined by Chris Grasso on piano, Zack Pride on bass and Lenny Robinson on drums. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarMandarin Oriental Hotel website

Andréa Wood & Michael Kramer, Tasting Room, 8 p.m. | Singer Andréa Wood has started catching people’s ears since returning to D.C., her hometown, in 2009. The Duke Ellington School of the Arts graduate moves fearlessly up and down octaves, all the while maintaining a distinct sense of purpose. She can explore the upper register in a beguiling waft, or plunge into the basement with buoyant, swelling articulation. Wood and guitarist Michael Kramer play Brazilian and classic jazz standards every week as background fare at the Tasting Room, a wine bar in Friendship Heights. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Tasting Room website

Gretchen Parlato, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m. | Gretchen Parlato, winner of the 2004 Thelonious Monk International Vocal Competition, just released her third album, The Lost and Found. It’s loaded with originals, standards and less trodden jazz classics to which she’s written her own lyrics. This acutely talented singer is big on ideas; her rhythmic vocal gymnastics are indelibly stamped with originality. She handles contemporary jazz, Brazilian and off-road pop explorations equally deftly. Two separate sets at 8:30 & 10:30. $20 cover in advance, $25 at the door, no minimum. View event on calendar | Bohemian Caverns profile

Eric Lewis (a.k.a. ELEW), HR-57, 9 p.m. | HR-57 held a “soft reopening” last weekend at its new H St. NE location. The 18-year-old jazz club’s “grand reopening” is this weekend, with the veteran jazz pianist Eric Lewis. The winner of the prestigious Thelonious Monk Competition had stints with Wynton Marsalis and the late Elvin Jones in the early-to-mid-2000s, but recently coined his own genre, ROCKJAZZ, and a new moniker, ELEW. ROCKJAZZ is essentially the interpolation of pop tunes for the solo piano, keeping all their grandeur — and volume — intact. There’s very little “jazz” involved. But at a series of cameo appearances at HR-57 late last year, Lewis interspersed a great deal more traditional jazz into his impromptu ROCKJAZZ performances. For instance, he used John Coltrane’s “Giant Steps” to tilt a rollicking rendition of “Sweet Home Alabama.” And he left room for extended improvisations around each theme. No matter how you feel about ROCKJAZZ, it’s sure to be a wild ride. $15 cover, no minimum. View event on calendarHR-57 website

Michaela Harrison, Twins Jazz, 9 & 11 p.m. | New Orleans-based Michaela Harrison sings hushed and thoughtful tunes that incorporate pop, R&B and Brazilian sensibilities. She’s got a strong, clear voice and an easygoing presentation. Two separate sets at 8 & 10 p.m. $20 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar | Twins Jazz profile

Peter Edelman Trio, Columbia Station, 9 p.m. | The stalwart D.C. piano player Peter Edelman every week leads a rotating cast of musicians that often outgrows the title “trio.” No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarColumbia Station profile

Aaron Myers, Black Fox Lounge, 9:30 p.m. | Vocalist Aaron Myers leads this straight-ahead jazz quartet, featuring piano, bass and drums, at the new Black Fox Lounge. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarBlack Fox Lounge profile

Donvonte McCoy, 18th St. Lounge, 10:30 p.m. | Arguably the city’s best jazz trumpeter, Donvonte McCoy plays every Friday and Saturday at the hip 18th St. Lounge. He likes to mix in some funk as well during the lounge gig, and he’s liable to inflect a touch of Chuck Brown-esque groove into his combo’s treatment of classic bop tunes by the likes of Miles Davis and Freddie Hubbard. He’s joined every Friday by the talented, Billie Holiday-indebted singer Integriti Reeves. Cover varies ($5-10), no minimum. View event on calendar | 18th St. Lounge profile

DeAndrey Howard’s Collector’s Edition, Utopia, 11 p.m. | Trumpeter DeAndre Howard’s weekly engagement at Utopia brings hordes to the restaurant and bar every Friday night. He and his small group, Collector’s Edition, play standards with a friendly, inviting touch, and they add to the positive vibes already flowing throughout the room — especially when Howard tosses aside the trumpet to sing a spontaneous blues. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Utopia profile

SATURDAY, APR. 16
cb picks:

  • Dave Brubeck, Blues Alley, 8 p.m.
  • Gretchen Parlato, Bohemian Caverns, 8:30 & 10: 30 p.m.
  • Donvonte McCoy, 18th Street Lounge, 10:30 p.m.
  • Elijah Jamal Experience, Utopia, 11 p.m.

Brad Linde Ensemble with Lena Seikaly, American Art Museum, 3 p.m. | The Brad Linde Ensemble, a mid-size jazz orchestra well versed in cool jazz repertory, teams up with the strong and pliant vocalist Lena Seikaly. The afternoon program is titled “Take 5! Ella in the Springtime,” and it is a celebration of songs mastered by the landmark vocalist Ella Fitzgerald. Free. View event on calendar | Museum website

Jam Session with Peter Edelman, Columbia Station, 4 p.m. | Pianist Peter Edelman, a constant presence on the D.C. jazz scene for years now, leads an afternoon jam session every Saturday and Sunday. No cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | Columbia Station profile

Jolley Brothers, B. Smith’s, 7 p.m. | The Jolley Brothers, Noble on keyboard and Nate on drums, play thrice a weekend at B. Smith’s, the upscale soul-food restaurant in Union Station’s massive East Hall. The Jolleys, who perform with a bassist, comprise one of D.C.’s most exciting and auspicious acts. With roots in gospel, soul and the modal bop of the 1960s, the brothers (who also compose prolifically) bring some of the most creative elements in the African-American music canon forward into the 21st century, all while stamping it with their own distinctive flavoring. But B. Smith’s is a restaurant first, and the music remains in the background – no matter how expertly played. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | B. Smith’s website

Mark Mosley Trio, Sala Thai (U St.), 7 p.m. | Baltimore guitarist Mark Mosley plays a slick hand as a smooth jazz guitarist, but he can also hunker down on serious bop. He performs laid-back straight-ahead here with his trio. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Sala Thai website

Full Ascent Jazz Band, Sala Thai (Petworth), 7 p.m. | This jazz band plays in a number of traditional styles, from hard-bop to Dixieland to calypso. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Sala Thai website

Corrected 4.15.11 2:27 p.m.: Elijah & the Po’ Boys Brad Linde Quartet, Bayou, 7 p.m. | Saxophonists Brad Linde and Sarah Hughes are D.C.’s resident cool-jazz masters, and they draw on a strong roster of original tunes, plus their own reinterpretations of jazz classics, when they play together in Linde’s quartet. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Bayou profile

Lena Seikaly & Potomac Jazz Project, 7:30 p.m., Extra Virgin Restaurant | Vocalist Lena Seikaly sings jazz standards with a confident and playful demeanor, displaying a haziness reminiscent of Esperanza Spalding as well as a deference to traditional greats. The Potomac Jazz Project is a quartet that takes on modern and classic jazz tunes (and even some pop covers) with a showmanly flair, as well as skill. It’s led by bassist Stan Hamrick, and its rotating lineup often features some of D.C.’s best musicians. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Extra Virgin’s website

Dave Brubeck, Blues Alley, 8 & 10 p.m. | Legendary pianist, composer and odd meter master Dave Brubeck is celebrating his 90th year. His birthday was in December, but he’s been playing celebratory concerts for the past five months. Now it’s Washington’s turn for a birthday party. Brubeck’s “Take Five” and “Blue Rondo à la Turk” – from his landmark 1959 LP, Take Five – are classics for their bold but palatable explorations of odd time signatures. They’re credited with revolutionizing the way some jazz musicians think utilize rhythm and meter. Brubeck has by now assembled a vast catalog that includes scores of albums and even some long, orchestral suites, but with his touring band he still plays classic quartet tunes and standards. Only one set. $150 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar | Blues Alley profile

Denise King Quartet, Mandarin Oriental Hotel, 8 p.m.| Vocalist Denise King, based in Philadelphia, sings a strong, lively and highly interactive blend of blues and jazz. She’s joined by Benjie Porecki on piano, Zack Pride on bass and Lenny Robinson on drums. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Mandarin Oriental Hotel website

D.C. Tap Festival Concert, Duke Ellington School Theater, 8 p.m. | Tap music has a long history in American entertainment, and in jazz. Its roots spread all across the globe, from Welsh clog dancing to the Juba dances of West Africans brought to the United States as slaves. Nowadays, tap dancing is still thriving, and the D.C. Tap Festival is out to prove it. The show includes a performance from tap dancer Baakari Wilder, who has performed with Wynton Marsalis and on Broadway, Grammy Award winning singer and D.C. native Mya and Thelonious Monk International Bass Competition winner (and also a D.C. native) Ben Williams. Tickets can be bought for a range of prices here. View event on calendar | Festival website

Gretchen Parlato, Bohemian Caverns, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m. | Gretchen Parlato, winner of the 2004 Thelonious Monk International Vocal Competition, just released her third album, The Lost and Found. It’s loaded with originals, standards and less trodden jazz classics to which she’s written her own lyrics. This acutely talented singer is big on ideas; her rhythmic vocal gymnastics are indelibly stamped with originality. She handles contemporary jazz, Brazilian and off-road pop explorations equally deftly. Two separate sets at 8:30 & 10:30. $20 cover in advance, $25 at the door, no minimum. View event on calendar | Bohemian Caverns profile

Brubeck Institute Jazz Quintet, Twins Jazz, 9 & 11 p.m. | Established by Dave Brubeck and his wife, Iola, the Brubeck Institute brings together young musicians to grow and learn together under its fellowship program. The five current fellowship recipients comprise the Brubeck Institute Jazz Quintet: Nick Frenay on trumpet, Sam Crowe on tenor saxophone, Alec Watson on piano, Bill Vonderhaar on bass and Colin McDaniel on drums. Two separate sets at 9 & 11 p.m. $15 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar | Twins Jazz profile

Eric Lewis a.k.a. ELEW, HR-57, 9 p.m. | HR-57 held a “soft reopening” last weekend at its new H St. NE location. The 18-year-old jazz club’s “grand reopening” is this weekend, with the veteran jazz pianist Eric Lewis. The winner of the prestigious Thelonious Monk Competition had stints with Wynton Marsalis and the late Elvin Jones in the early-to-mid-2000s, but recently coined his own genre, ROCKJAZZ, and a new moniker, ELEW. ROCKJAZZ is essentially the interpolation of pop tunes for the solo piano, keeping all their grandeur — and volume — intact. There’s very little “jazz” involved. But at a series of cameo appearances at HR-57 late last year, Lewis interspersed a great deal more traditional jazz into his impromptu ROCKJAZZ performances. For instance, he used John Coltrane’s “Giant Steps” to tilt a rollicking rendition of “Sweet Home Alabama.” And he left room for extended improvisations around each theme. No matter how you feel about ROCKJAZZ, it’s sure to be a wild ride. $15 cover, no minimum. View event on calendarHR-57 website

Kaos Theory, Columbia Station, 9:30 p.m. | Kaos Theory is a smooth funk band. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Columbia Station profile

Donvonte McCoy, 18th St. Lounge, 10:30 p.m. | Arguably the city’s best jazz trumpeter, Donvonte McCoy plays every Friday and Saturday at the hip 18th St. Lounge. He likes to mix in some funk as well during the lounge gig, and he’s liable to inflect a touch of Chuck Brown-esque groove into his combo’s treatment of classic bop tunes by the likes of Miles Davis and Freddie Hubbard. Cover varies ($5-10), no minimum. View event on calendar | 18th St. Lounge profile

Elijah Jamal Experience, Utopia, 11 p.m. | Young powerhouse tenor saxophonist Elijah Jamal Balbed heads up one of the swinginest shows on U Street every Saturday night. His sound drips with the blues, and from the bell of this 20-year-old’s horn seem to rise the ghosts of Coleman Hawkins and Dexter Gordon. With the Washington City Paper‘s 2010 Best New D.C. Jazz Musician award under his belt, Balbed can always be expected always to deliver the goods. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarUtopia profile

The Hang (with Michael Price, Steve Novosel and Eric Allen), Bohemian Caverns, midnight | Bohemian Caverns’ late-night jam, The Hang, is hosted by a different band every week of the month. The kitchen remains open until 1 a.m., so there’s a chance to get a late bite without having to traipse to Ben’s Chili Bowl. This week, the jam is led by pianist Michael Price, legendary local bassist Steve Novosel and drummer Eric Allen $7 cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | Bohemian Caverns profile

SUNDAY, APR. 17

cb picks:

  • Jolley Brothers, B. Smith’s, 12 p.m.
  • Dave Brubeck, Blues Ally, 8 p.m.
  • Sunday Jazz Lounge (feat. Dan Roberts), Bossa Bistro, 8 & 10 p.m.

Jolley Brothers, B. Smith’s, 12 p.m. | The Jolley Brothers, Noble on keyboard and Nate on drums, play thrice a weekend at B. Smith’s, the upscale soul-food restaurant in Union Station’s massive East Hall. The Jolleys, who perform with a bassist, comprise one of D.C.’s most exciting and auspicious acts. With roots in gospel, soul and the modal bop of the 1960s, the brothers (who also compose prolifically) bring some of the most creative elements in the African-American music canon forward into the 21st century, all while stamping it with their own distinctive flavoring. B. Smith’s is a restaurant first, and the music remains in the background – no matter how expertly played. But as far as jazz brunch goes, it’s hard to top the Jolleys’ music. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | B. Smith’s website

Jam Session with Peter Edelman, Columbia Station, 4 p.m. | Pianist Peter Edelman, a constant presence on the D.C. jazz scene for years now, leads an afternoon jam session every Saturday and Sunday. No cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | Columbia Station profile

Brubeck Institute Jazz Quintet, Kennedy Center Millenium Stage, 6 p.m. | Established by Dave Brubeck and his wife, Iola, the Brubeck Institute brings together young musicians to grow and learn together under its fellowship program. The five current fellowship recipients comprise the Brubeck Institute Jazz Quintet: Nick Frenay on trumpet, Sam Crowe on tenor saxophone, Alec Watson on piano, Bill Vonderhaar on bass and Colin McDaniel on drums. Free. View event on calendarMillenium Stage website

Jazz Jam, Dahlak, 6:30 p.m. | This jazz jam presents a friendly, relaxed environment where professionals and amateurs can play together. No cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | View Dahlak profile

Potomac Jazz Project, Laporta’s, 6:30 p.m. | The Potomac Jazz Project is a quartet that takes on modern and classic jazz tunes (and even some pop covers) with a showmanly flair, as well as skill. It’s led by bassist Stan Hamrick, and its rotating lineup often features some of D.C.’s best musicians. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Laporta’s website

Rachel Panay, Black Fox Lounge, 9:30 p.m. | Rachel Panay sings with the Cristian Perez Latin Jazz Trio. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarBlack Fox Lounge profile

Dave Brubeck, Blues Alley, 8 & 10 p.m. | Legendary pianist, composer and odd meter master Dave Brubeck is celebrating his 90th year. His birthday was in December, but he’s been playing celebratory concerts for the past five months. Now it’s Washington’s turn for a birthday party. Brubeck’s “Take Five” and “Blue Rondo à la Turk” – from his landmark 1959 LP, Take Five – are classics for their bold but palatable explorations of odd time signatures. They’re credited with revolutionizing the way some jazz musicians think utilize rhythm and meter. Brubeck has by now assembled a vast catalog that includes scores of albums and even some long, orchestral suites, but with his touring band he still plays classic quartet tunes and standards. Only one set. $150 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar| Blues Alley profile

Sunday Jazz Lounge (feat. Dan Roberts), Bossa Bistro, 8 p.m. | Guitarist Rodney Richardson and trumpeter Joe Herrera are looking to broaden jazz’s reach in D.C. while challenging the city’s musicians creatively. Increase popularity and raise the quality bar at the same time? you ask skeptically. Sure, the two don’t always go together – but Richardson and Herrera’s Sunday Jazz Lounge effort has its head in the right place, and it’s worth getting behind. Plus, from the crackling, friendly vibe and strong turnout that their first few lounges have enjoyed, it seems they’re succeeding. Each week, the show starts with a special unaccompanied performance by a different local jazz talent. This week, pianist Dan Roberts takes on the challenge. After his set, Richardson and Herrera will lead their quartet – featuring bassist Eric Harper and drummer Dave McDonald – through some of the less-traversed compositions in the bop songbook. The lounge spent all of March (its debut month) at Twins Jazz, but is now bouncing from venue to venue. This edition takes place at Bossa Bistro, which used to have more jazz but now focuses on world music. It will be good to see bop return to the Bossa stage. $10 cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | BloomBars website

Julie Mack, Twins Jazz, 8 & 10 p.m. | Julie Mack sings both traditional jazz and Brazilian music. She’s joined by Amy K. Bormet on piano, Zack Pride on bass and Leland Nakamura on drums. Two separate sets at 8 & 10 p.m. $10 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar | Twins profile

Peter Edelman Trio, Columbia Station, 8:30 p.m. | The stalwart D.C. piano player Peter Edelman every Sunday night leads a rotating cast of musicians that often outgrows the title “trio.” no cover, one-drink minimum. View event on calendarColumbia Station profile

Cheryl Jones Trio, Utopia, 9 p.m. | Singer Cheryl Jones has a weekly engagement every Sunday at Utopia, where she sings with depth, force and clarity. Jones is equally likely to sing jazz standards, pop tunes or gospel classics. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Utopia profile


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