Weekend in Jazz | 6.10-6.12: DC Jazz Fest climaxes with Heath Bros., McFerrin, National Mall concert

Bobby McFerrin performs with Howard University's Afro Blue jazz choir on Saturday in a DC Jazz Festival concert at the Warner Theatre. Courtesy erinc salor/flickr

by Giovanni Russonello
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Welcome to this week’s edition of “Weekend in Jazz,” our list of every D.C. jazz show on our radar. The DC Jazz Festival culminates this weekend, with a concert by Bobby McFerrin at the Warner Theatre and an all-day National Mall show this Sunday featuring Eddie Palmieri and Roy Hargrove. (Check out CapitalBop’s picks for the DC Jazz Fest.) In another part of the festival, there are a few great Jazz in the ‘Hoods shows this weekend: The legendary Heath Brothers are at Bohemian Caverns, and CapitalBop is presenting two presented jazz lofts that showcase innovative talents from New York City and D.C. All performances associated with the festival are marked “DCJF” below, and our favorite shows have a  label. As always, you can read CapitalBop’s full listings directly at our D.C. jazz calendar, if you’d rather. Happy hunting!

FRIDAY, JUNE 10

cb picks:

  • Heath Brothers, Bohemian Caverns, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m.
  • Darius Jones Trio, Red Door, 9 p.m.
  • Anthony Nelson, Twins Jazz, 9 p.m.
  • Donvonte McCoy, 18th Street Lounge, 10:30 p.m.

Jazz in the Garden, Deanna Bogart, 5 p.m. | Singer and pianist Deanna Bogart plays in what she calls a “bluesion” style – blues fused with early boogie woogie, jazz and R&B. Free. View event on calendar | Jazz in the Garden website

Pepe Gonzalez, Westminster Presbyterian Church, 6 p.m. | What began as an experiment over a decade ago continues today as one of Washington’s greatest weekly traditions: Westminster Presbyterian Church’s “Jazz Night.” Every Friday night, the house of God becomes a hub for fish frying, communing and jamming on straight-ahead jazz. Pepe Gonzalez, a widely renowned bassist and teacher in the area, leads a band here featuring Carl Cornwell on sax, Janelle Gill on piano, Tamor Sadi on guitar and Mark Morella on drums. $5 cover for adults, no cover for attendees under 16, no minimum. View event on calendar | Westminster Presbyterian Church website

Cabessa & Just Us, JoJo, 6 p.m. (DCJF) | [No description available] View event on calendar | JoJo profile

Jacqui Simmons & Friends, Sala Thai (Petworth), 7 p.m. (DCJF) | Jacqui Simmons sings jazz standards with a heartfelt and elegant presentation. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Sala Thai website

Karen Gray Trio, Sala Thai (Bethesda), 7 p.m. (DCJF) | Commanding vocalist Karen Gray sings laid-back renditions of jazz standards in a drumless trio. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Sala Thai website

Potomac Jazz Project, Sala Thai (U St.), 7 p.m. (DCJF) | The Yamomanem Jazz Band plays a faithful take on New Orleans jazz, conjuring the days of King Oliver and early Louis Armstrong with its lush brass section. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarSala Thai website

Jolley Brothers, B. Smith’s, 7 p.m. (DCJF) | The Jolley Brothers, Noble on keyboard and Nate on drums, play thrice a weekend at B. Smith’s, the upscale soul-food restaurant in Union Station’s massive East Hall. The Jolleys, who perform with a bassist, comprise one of D.C.’s most exciting and auspicious acts. With roots in gospel, soul and the modal bop of the 1960s, the brothers (who also compose prolifically) bring some of the most creative elements in the African-American music canon forward into the 21st century, all while stamping it with their own distinctive flavoring. But B. Smith’s is a restaurant first, and the music remains in the background – no matter how expertly played. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarB. Smith’s website

Peter White, Blues Alley, 8 & 11 p.m. Peter White is a smooth jazz guitarist. Two separate sets at 8 & 10 p.m. $40 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar | Blues Alley profile

Lena Seikaly Quartet, Mandarin Oriental Hotel, 8 p.m. (DCJF) | Vocalist Lena Seikaly sings jazz standards with a confident and playful demeanor, displaying a haziness reminiscent of Esperanza Spalding, but also nodding to traditional greats. She’s backed by a trio. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarMandarin Oriental Hotel website

Andréa Wood & Michael Kramer, Tasting Room, 8 p.m. | Singer Andréa Wood has started catching people’s ears since returning to D.C., her hometown, in 2009. The Duke Ellington School of the Arts graduate moves fearlessly up and down octaves, all the while maintaining a distinct sense of purpose. She can explore the upper register in a beguiling waft, or plunge into the basement with buoyant, swelling articulation. Wood and guitarist Michael Kramer play Brazilian and classic jazz standards every week as background fare at the Tasting Room, a wine bar in Friendship Heights. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Tasting Room website

Batuque, Gaffney’s, 8 p.m. | Batuque is a five-piece Brazilian jazz band. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Gaffney’s website

Heath Brothers, Bohemian Caverns, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m. (DCJF) | Between the three of them, brothers Percy, Jimmy, and Albert “Tootie” Heath have collectively had an undeniable impact on jazz music. Each one separately played a role in the founding and fashioning of hard bop in the 1950s, then in the ’70s they came together to record and perform as a band: the Heath Brothers. Separately, bassist Percy Heath (who passed away in 2005) was an in-demand musician during the bebop era, performing and recording with Miles Davis, Johnny Griffin and Dizzy Gillespie before joining the iconic Modern Jazz Quartet. Tenor saxophonist and NEA Jazz Master Jimmy Heath was also a popular hired gun and bandleader during the bebop era, performing often beside his brother in bands led by Gillespie and Davis. He was also a prolific composer, penning a number of tunes that have become jazz standards. Drummer Albert “Tootie” Heath made his recording debut with John Coltrane, on the saxophone legend’s first album as a leader. He was an in-demand hired gun, recording with many artists from Benny Golson’s Jazztet to Nina Simone. Jimmy and Tootie continue to tour, and they recorded a new album in 2009. $30 cover in advance, $35 at the door, no minimum. [Preview by Luke Stewart] View event on calendar | Bohemian Caverns profile

Screening: Performance Portraits, Dance Place, 8 p.m. (DCJF) Performance Portraits investigates the commonalities between jazz and modern dance, profiling figures such as Julius Hemphill, Don Pullen and Fred Hersch. Bill Warrell, a jazz impresario, will lead a discussion before and after the film. $10 for adults, $5 for children 12 and under. View event on calendar | Dance Place website

Sin Miedo, Bossa Bistro, 9 p.m. | Sin Miedo is an energetic, nine-piece Salsa band that plays highly danceable Afro-Cuban jazz, Mambo and Samba. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Bossa Bistro website

Anthony Nelson, Twins Jazz, 9 & 11 p.m. (DCJF) | Multi-talented woodwind player Anthony Nelson, who typically plays saxophone, has a slick, soulful improvisational sensibility. In his last appearance at Twins, he performed with a strolling trio, and his brawny tenor tone filled the entire club. Two separate sets at 9 and 11 p.m. $20 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendar | Twins Jazz profile

Antonio Parker Quartet, HR-57, 9 p.m. | Alto saxophonist Antonio Parker has long been a regular performer at HR-57, and when the club moved to H St. NE earlier this year, he played at opening night. Parker’s playing refers to John Coltrane’s tenor technique, but his aggressive tone and rhythmic inclinations are more contemporary, bringing neo-soul and R&B influences into his otherwise straight-ahead bebop. Parker’s style on the horn often nods toward another one of his personal favorites, the contemporary master Kenny Garrett. $15 cover, no minimum. View event on calendarHR-57 website

Darius Jones Trio with OOO, Red Door, 9 p.m. (DCJF) | Part three of CapitalBop’s D.C. Jazz Loft Series at the DCJF presents the Darius Jones Trio with local group OOO. Jones is shaping up to be one of the most influential saxophonists of his generation. A fierce but measured improviser, his melodies are both hard to swallow and astonishingly easy to memorize. In 2009, he released a debut album, Man’ish Boy, to vast acclaim. The Darius Jones Trio is fervently and fearlessly avant-garde, but it’s also steeped in the jazz tradition: It swings, it sings and it toys around with sound in a way that might impress Charles Mingus or Ornette Coleman. $12 in advance, $16 at the door, BYOB. View event on calendarRed Door website

Peter Edelman Trio, Columbia Station, 9 p.m. (DCJF) | The stalwart D.C. piano player Peter Edelman every week leads a rotating cast of musicians that often outgrows the title “trio.” No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarColumbia Station profile

Maureen Mullaney, Black Fox Lounge, 9:30 p.m. (DCJF) | Maureen Mullaney sings jazz and blues songs with a light ensemble. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Black Fox profile

Donvonte McCoy, 18th St. Lounge, 10:30 p.m. | Arguably the city’s best jazz trumpeter, Donvonte McCoy plays every Friday and Saturday at the hip 18th St. Lounge. He likes to mix in some funk as well during the lounge gig, and he’s liable to inflect a touch of Chuck Brown-esque groove into his combo’s treatment of classic bop tunes by the likes of Miles Davis and Freddie Hubbard. After all, the setting is that of a dance club, not a jazz joint – no tables and chairs or hushed applause after every solo. Donvonte’s joined every Friday by the talented, Billie Holiday-indebted singer Integriti Reeves. Cover varies ($5-10), no minimum. View event on calendar | 18th St. Lounge profile

DeAndrey Howard’s Collector’s Edition, Utopia, 11 p.m. (DCJF) | Trumpeter DeAndre Howard’s weekly engagement at Utopia brings hordes to the restaurant and bar every Friday night. He and his small group, Collector’s Edition, play standards with a friendly, inviting touch, and they add to the positive vibes already flowing throughout the room — especially when Howard tosses aside the trumpet to sing a spontaneous blues. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Utopia profile

Origem, Cashion’s Eat Place, midnight | This local band plays electric Brazilian jazz, mixing samba, bossa nova, forro, afoxe, maracatu, and partido alto. No cover, one-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Cashion’s website

SATURDAY, JUNE 11

cb picks:

  • Bobby McFerrin, Warner Theater, 7:30 p.m.
  • Heath Brothers, Bohemian Caverns, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m.
  • J.D. Allen Trio, Subterranean A, 9 p.m.
  • Anthony Nelson, Twins Jazz, 9 & 11 p.m.
  • Donvonte McCoy Quintet, 18th Street Lounge 10:30 p.m.

Esther Haynes Trio and others, O/H Gallery, 3 p.m. (DCJF) | The Esther Haynes Trio leads a lineup of varied jazz bands at the gallery. Free. View event on calendar | O/H website

Jam Session with Peter Edelman, Columbia Station, 4 p.m. (DCJF) | Pianist Peter Edelman, a constant presence on the D.C. jazz scene for years now, leads an afternoon jam session every Saturday and Sunday. No cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | Columbia Station profile

Charles Woods Quartet, Johnny’s Half Shell, 6 p.m. (DCJF) | Saxophonist Charles Woods plays and has recorded in both free and straight-ahead jazz styles, but for his regular gig at Johnny’s Half Shell he keeps things within the traditional bop realm. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Johnny’s Half Shell website

Jolley Brothers, B. Smith’s, 7 p.m. (DCJF) | The Jolley Brothers, Noble on keyboard and Nate on drums, play thrice a weekend at B. Smith’s, the upscale soul-food restaurant in Union Station’s massive East Hall. The Jolleys, who perform with a bassist, comprise one of D.C.’s most exciting and auspicious acts. With roots in gospel, soul and the modal bop of the 1960s, the brothers (who also compose prolifically) bring some of the most creative elements in the African-American music canon forward into the 21st century, all while stamping it with their own distinctive flavoring. But B. Smith’s is a restaurant first, and the music remains in the background – no matter how expertly played. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | B. Smith’s website

Mark Mosley Trio, Sala Thai (U St.), 7 p.m. (DCJF) | Baltimore guitarist Mark Mosley plays a slick hand as a smooth jazz guitarist, but he can also hunker down on serious bop. He performs laid-back straight-ahead here with his trio. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Sala Thai website

Triple Double Jazz Band, Sala Thai (Petworth), 7 p.m. (DCJF) | Consisting of Joey Whitney on tenor sax, Ed Gallagher on guitar, Alan Pachter on bass and Tom Reed on drums, the Triple Double Jazz Band plays straightforward, straight-ahead versions of jazz standards. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarSala Thai website

Anthony “Swampdog” Clark, Bayou, 7 p.m. | Anthony “Swampdog” Clark plays blues harmonica. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Bayou profile

Lena Seikaly & Potomac Jazz Project, Extra Virgin Restaurant, 7:30 p.m. | Vocalist Lena Seikaly sings jazz standards with a confident and playful demeanor, displaying a haziness reminiscent of Esperanza Spalding as well as a deference to traditional greats. The Potomac Jazz Project is a quartet that takes on modern and classic jazz tunes (and even some pop covers) with a showmanly flair, as well as skill. It’s led by bassist Stan Hamrick, and its rotating lineup often features some of D.C.’s best musicians. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Extra Virgin’s website

Nancy Scimone, Henley Park Hotel, 7:30 p.m. | Nancy Scimone reaches into the jazz and popular American songbooks during this weekly gig at the Henley Park Hotel in downtown D.C. She’s typically joined by a pianist. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Henley Park’s website

Dee Stone & Charles Wright, Black Fox Lounge, 7:30 p.m. (DCJF) | Dee Stone and Charles Wright play soul and funk. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarBlack Fox profile

Bobby McFerrin, Warner Theatre, 7:30 p.m. (DCJF) | Some people might remember him for the a capella reggae hit “Don’t Worry, Be Happy,” but legendary vocalist Bobby McFerrin has long been at the vanguard of his craft, pushing the boundaries of the voice in music. He has created a number of techniques, and is a pioneer in overdubbed vocal soundscapes. His 1984 album “The Voice” was a landmark as the first solo vocal jazz album – actually without any overdubs, accompaniment, or signal processing. He is joined at this performance by Howard University’s similarly groundbreaking vocal group, Afro Blue. In the past few years, the ensemble has garnered wide attention through its appearances at the Library of Congress and the Kennedy Center, as well as the recent release of an acclaimed album of songs recorded over six years. The fact that this is a collegiate ensemble makes its prowess all the more impressive. For the DC Jazz Festival, the combined powers of Bobby McFerrin and Afro Blue become VOCAbuLarieS. Tickets $38-$82. [Preview by Luke Stewart] View event on calendarWarner Theatre website

Julian Hipkins Quartet, Mandarin Oriental Hotel, 8 p.m. (DCJF) | Julian Hipkins sings with a swingin’ flair and jaunty, deep voice that recall Jimmy Rushing. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarMandarin Oriental Hotel website

Peter White, Blues Alley, 8 & 11 p.m. | Peter White is a smooth jazz guitarist. Two separate sets at 8 & 10 p.m. $40 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendarBlues Alley profile

Richard Miller, Kramerbooks & Afterwords, 8 p.m. (DCJF) | Richard Miller plays solo jazz guitar. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Kramerbooks website

Heath Brothers, Bohemian Caverns, 8:30 & 10:30 p.m. (DCJF) | Between the three of them, brothers Percy, Jimmy, and Albert “Tootie” Heath have collectively had an undeniable impact on jazz music. Each one separately played a role in the founding and fashioning of hard bop in the 1950s, then in the ’70s they came together to record and perform as a band: the Heath Brothers. Separately, bassist Percy Heath (who passed away in 2005) was an in-demand musician during the bebop era, performing and recording with Miles Davis, Johnny Griffin and Dizzy Gillespie before joining the iconic Modern Jazz Quartet. Tenor saxophonist and NEA Jazz Master Jimmy Heath was also a popular hired gun and bandleader during the bebop era, performing often beside his brother in bands led by Gillespie and Davis. He was also a prolific composer, penning a number of tunes that have become jazz standards. Drummer Albert “Tootie” Heath made his recording debut with John Coltrane, on the saxophone legend’s first album as a leader. He was an in-demand hired gun, recording with many artists from Benny Golson’s Jazztet to Nina Simone. Jimmy and Tootie continue to tour, and they recorded a new album in 2009. $30 cover in advance, $35 at the door, no minimum. [Preview by Luke Stewart] View event on calendar | Bohemian Caverns profile

Anthony Nelson, Twins Jazz, 9 & 11 p.m. (DCJF) | Multi-talented woodwind player Anthony Nelson, who typically plays saxophone, has a slick, soulful improvisational sensibility. In his last appearance at Twins, he performed with a strolling trio, and his brawny tenor tone filled the entire club. Two separate sets at 9 and 11 p.m. $20 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendarTwins Jazz profile

Ajay Parham Quartet, HR-57, 9 p.m. | Ajay Parham is a smooth, deep-voiced vocalist who sings R&B with inflections of jazz. But on the bandstand at HR-57, where he’s long been a stalwart performer, Parham often tries his hand at jazz standards. $15 cover, no minimum. View event on calendarHR-57 website

Palanke Music Company, Bossa Bistro, 9 p.m. (DCJF) | Led by vocalist and guitarist Jaime Andrés Salazar, a.k.a. Gato, Palanke Music Company is tropicalia meets electro meets Samba meets Afro-Cuban jazz. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Bossa profile

J.D. Allen Trio with the Elijah Jamal Balbed Quintet, Subterranean A, 9 p.m. (DCJF) | J.D. Allen is one of the most respected tenor saxophonists making waves on the New York City scene right now. His gritty but gorgeous playing is infused with what he calls an “urban” sensibility, and he excels with only bass and drums behind him. Allen’s recent CD, Victory!, was released earlier this spring to wide critical acclaim. Allen goes on right at 9 p.m. (he prefers not to have bands open for him), but then at 10:30 local tenor saxophone powerhouse Elijah Jamal Balbed leads his quintet. This show is in a converted basement concert hall. $16 cover in advance, $20 at the door, $8 in advance for discounted midnight show, $10 at the door. BYOB. View event on calendarRed Door website

Kaos Theory, Columbia Station, 9:30 p.m. | Kaos Theory is a smooth funk band. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Columbia Station profile

Donvonte McCoy, 18th St. Lounge, 10:30 p.m. | Arguably the city’s best jazz trumpeter, Donvonte McCoy plays every Friday and Saturday at the hip 18th St. Lounge. He likes to mix in some funk as well during the lounge gig, and he’s liable to inflect a touch of Chuck Brown-esque groove into his combo’s treatment of classic bop tunes by the likes of Miles Davis and Freddie Hubbard. After all, the setting is that of a dance club, not a jazz joint – no tables and chairs or hushed applause after every solo. Cover varies ($5-10), no minimum. View event on calendar | 18th St. Lounge profile

Blake Meister, Utopia, 11 p.m. (DCJF) | Bassist Blake Meister wields a fortified tone and spot-on precision, and he’s a popular sideman on the D.C. scene. Tonight, he subs in for saxophonist Elijah Jamal Balbed (who’s playing CapitalBop’s J.D. Allen show at Subterranean A). No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendarUtopia profile

The Hang, Bohemian Caverns, midnight (DCJF) | Bohemian Caverns’ late-night jam, The Hang, is hosted by a different band every week of the month. The kitchen remains open until 1 a.m., so there’s a chance to get a late bite without having to traipse to Ben’s Chili Bowl. $7 cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | Bohemian Caverns profile

Origem, Cashion’s Eat Place, 11:30 (DCJF) | This local band plays electric Brazilian jazz, mixing samba, bossa nova, forro, afoxe, maracatu, and partido alto. No cover, one-drink minimum. View event on calendarCashion’s website

SUNDAY, JUNE 12

cb picks:

  • Jolley Brothers, B. Smith’s, 12 p.m.
  • Jazz on the National Mall, 1 p.m.

Marshall Keys, Acadiana, 11 a.m. (DCJF) | Marshall Keys’ saxophone can sing the blues or swing hard to the rhythms of bebop; the native Washingtonian is a fluid, graceful player. He plays every Sunday brunch at Acadiana. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Acadiana website

Jolley Brothers, B. Smith’s, 12 p.m. (DCJF) | The Jolley Brothers, Noble on keyboard and Nate on drums, play thrice a weekend at B. Smith’s, the upscale soul-food restaurant in Union Station’s massive East Hall. The Jolleys, who perform with a bassist, comprise one of D.C.’s most exciting and auspicious acts. With roots in gospel, soul and the modal bop of the 1960s, the brothers (who also compose prolifically) bring some of the most creative elements in the African-American music canon forward into the 21st century, all while stamping it with their own distinctive flavoring. B. Smith’s is a restaurant first, and the music remains in the background – no matter how expertly played. But as far as jazz brunch goes, it’s hard to top the Jolleys’ music. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | B. Smith’s website

Jazz on the National Mall, 1 p.m. (DCJF) | The DC Jazz Fest’s most popular feature – which went dormant for last year’s festival – is back: a full day of free music on the National Mall featuring two of the world’s top jazz ambassadors, Eddie Palmieri and Roy Hargrove, plus three international artists whose stars are rising. Palmieri, who will helm his All-Star Salsa Orchestra, is one of the greatest living Latin jazz pianists – but even that description doesn’t do him any justice. Throughout his career, he has incorporated bebop and fusion influences with aplomb. Still, it’s his work as a leader of Afro-Caribbean bands, usually with his kinetic keyboard playing in the driver’s seat, that has made Palmieri a legend. Hargrove, a trumpeter who has grown from boy wonder to jazz statesman, will lead his hip-hop/jazz fusion band, the RH Factor. The other acts include the strong Chilean vocalist Claudia Acuña, the French jazz harmonica player Frédéric Yonnet and Nigerian singer and guitarist Toby Foyeh. Free. View event on calendar | Sylvan Theater Wiki

Jam Session with Peter Edelman, Columbia Station, 4 p.m. (DCJF) | Pianist Peter Edelman, a constant presence on the D.C. jazz scene for years now, leads an afternoon jam session every Saturday and Sunday. No cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | Columbia Station profile

Jazz Jam, Dahlak, 6:30 p.m. (DCJF) | This jazz jam presents a friendly, relaxed environment where professionals and amateurs can play together. No cover, no minimum. View event on calendar | View Dahlak profile

Potomac Jazz Project, Laporta’s, 6:30 p.m. | The Potomac Jazz Project is a quartet that takes on modern and classic jazz tunes (and even some pop covers) with a showmanly flair, as well as skill. It’s led by bassist Stan Hamrick, and its rotating lineup often features some of D.C.’s best musicians. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Laporta’s website

Jam Session with the Jolley Brothers, Bohemian Caverns, 8 p.m. (DCJF) | The Jolley Brothers – Noble on keyboard and Nate on drums – infuse R&B and neo-soul into their jazz playing. Whenever they lead a jam session, the line between straight-ahead and soul always come tumbling down. Cover TBA, no minimum. View event on calendar |Bohemian Caverns profile

Mike Flaherty’s Dixieland Jazz Direct, Zoo Bar Café, 7:30 p.m. (DCJF) | This combo specializes in traditional New Orleans-style jazz. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Zoo Bar website

Sharon Raquel, Twins Jazz, 8 & 10 p.m. (DCJF) | Vocalist Sharon Raquel performs here with the Kash Wright Trio. The local singer injects lightness and soul into jazz standards, and cites as some of her major influences Ella Fitzgerald, Nat King Cole, Sarah Vaughan and Jane Monheit. Her backing band comprises Prakash Wright on piano, Mike Montgomery on bass and Bobby Beall on drums. Two separate sets at 8 & 10 p.m. $10 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendarTwins profile

Peter White, Blues Alley, 8 & 10 p.m. | Peter White is a smooth jazz guitarist. Two separate sets at 8 & 10 p.m. $40 cover, $10 minimum. View event on calendarBlues Alley profile

DC Choro, Grill from Ipanema, 8 p.m. (DCJF) | DC Choro is a sextet that plays Brazilian music drawing on European folk traditions. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Grill from Ipanema profile

Peter Edelman Trio, Columbia Station, 8:30 p.m. (DCJF) | The stalwart D.C. piano player Peter Edelman every Sunday night leads a rotating cast of musicians that often outgrows the title “trio.” no cover, one-drink minimum. View event on calendarColumbia Station profile

Cheryl Jones Trio, Utopia, 9 p.m. (DCJF) | Singer Cheryl Jones has a weekly engagement every Sunday at Utopia, where she sings with depth, force and clarity. Jones is equally likely to sing jazz standards, pop tunes or gospel classics. No cover, 1-drink minimum. View event on calendar | Utopia profile

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